+7 (499) 653-60-72 Доб. 448Москва и область +7 (812) 426-14-07 Доб. 773Санкт-Петербург и область
Main page
WORK
Production fruit wines

Production fruit wines

This July, Tasting Table celebrates the great state of American food and drink. The pantry shelves of America's homesteads weren't just lined with pickles and preserves: fruit wine—legally defined as the fermented juice of any fruit other than grapes—enjoyed equal pride on the rural table. Though fruit wine isn't as common as it once was , there are still some producers making bottles—be they dry or sweet, made from Idaho huckleberries or Florida mangoes—that serve to showcase the pure fruit of their labor. Here are four of the best. Chateau Fontaine Cherry Wine As the nation's tart-cherry capital, Michigan naturally leads the way in cherry wine production. Don Matthies of Lake Leelanau's Chateau Fontaine uses fruit "grown just down the road on my son's farm"—not only sour but also dark and yellow cherries—to make his version, which has proven so popular that he sells out of his 1,plus cases annually.

VIDEO ON THE TOPIC: Automatic Raphael Winery fruit wine filling production line-- Gosunm machinery

Dear readers! Our articles talk about typical ways to resolve Production fruit wines, but each case is unique.

If you want to know, how to solve your particular problem - contact the online consultant form on the right or call the numbers on the website. It is fast and free!

Content:

How To Make Fruit Wine

Functional foods are foods that provide positive health effects apart from the provision of essential nutrients. Along with nutraceuticals, they represent the top trends in the food industry. Fruit wines are considered functional foods. When assessing the fruit wine quality, a wide range of descriptors are taken into consideration, namely physicochemical and sensorial properties of fruit wine.

Furthermore, within the context of the new food products development e. Functional properties are determined by the content of the biologically active components, such as polyphenols, vitamins and micro- and macrominerals. It is also important to consider the food-safety issues regarding the fruit wines consummation, that is, the presence of pesticides, mycotoxins and biogenic amines in different fruit wines.

This chapter aims to give an overview of various factors used to evaluate the quality and the functional properties of fruit wines. Descriptive Food Science. However, there is literature gap data regarding the production, properties and health benefits of different fruit wines, compared to grape wines.

The utilisation of functional foods for health-care can lead to the reduction of the use of pharmaceuticals or their replacement. According to the Functional Food and Nutraceuticals market report [ 2 ], many consumers were prompted to turn to preventive or alternative health-care practices due to the increase of health-care costs [ 3 ]. Consequently, the consummation of functional foods and nutraceuticals increased substantially.

Moderate consumption of grape wine mainly red has a beneficial health effects when combined with balanced diet, which is confirmed by many studies [ 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 ]. Some of the reported effects regarding health effects include the protection of the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, ischaemic stroke, hypertension, diabetes, dietary cancers, peptic ulcers, kidney stones and macular degeneration, as well as stimulation of resistance to infection and bone density retention [ 10 , 11 , 12 , 13 , 14 ].

However, apart from grapes, a whole range of other fruits that differ in shape, taste, colour and nutritive value can also be utilised for the production of wine [ 9 ], which are nowadays gaining the full acceptance at the market [ 15 ]. Fruit wines have proved to be an excellent dietary source of antioxidants, phytonutrients and minerals [ 16 ]. According to the European regulations, fruit wines must be obtained by the fermentation of fruits or respective juices other than grape.

Based on the carbon dioxide retention and content, fruit wines can be classified either as still or sparkling, while their permitted alcoholic strength lies between 1.

Winemaking technology of fruit wines is mostly similar to that of grape wines, except for the variations based on the fruit used, that usually involves the adjustment of fruit juice for winemaking, for example, sugar content or acidity. Geographical area, that is, the fruit cultivars typically grown in that specific area, mainly determines the production and consumption of different fruit wines.

Non-grape fruits successfully used for the production of fruit wines in different parts of the world include blackberries, strawberries, currants, apples, wild apricots, pears, kiwifruit, plums, peaches, cherries, bananas, pineapples, cashew nuts, pomegranates, lemons, tangerines, oranges, dates, figs, and so on [ 17 , 18 ]. There is a large volume of published studies describing chemical composition, with the particular emphasis on various bioactive compounds, of different fruits and fruit juices [ 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 , 25 , 26 , 27 , 28 , 29 , 30 , 31 , 32 ].

However, comprehensive reviews of respective fruit wines are still scarce, as well as the comparison of different fruit wines regarding their bioactive compounds.

The primary focus of this chapter includes three most popular fruit wines in Croatia, produced from three different groups of fruit, namely berries blackberry wine , stone fruit sour cherry wine and pome fruit apple wine , in respect to chemical constituents affecting their nutritional, sensorial and health-related properties. Furthermore, food-safety issues, that is, the presence of pesticides, mycotoxins and biogenic amines, are also tackled. Fruit wine consists of two primary ingredients—water and ethanol, the latter being the primary product of alcoholic fermentation, essential for both flavour and stability of wine.

Fermentation is an anaerobic process carried out by yeast in which yeast converts the relatively high level of sugars present in fruits into ethanol and carbon dioxide [ 14 ]. Ethanol production is controlled by three main factors: sugar content, fermentation temperature and yeast strain. The alcohol content is usually expressed as a volume percentage.

The role of ethanol in wine is multiple: it acts as an essential cosolvent along with water in extracting fruits constituents, it serves as a reactant in the generation of important volatile compounds e. The secondary products of yeast metabolism include higher alcohols containing more than two carbons , also known as fusel alcohols or fusel oils [ 34 ].

Some of the representatives of higher alcohols are n -propanol, isobutyl alcohol 2-methylpropanol , 2-methyl butanol optically active amyl alcohol , isoamyl alcohol and 2-phenyl ethanol. Glycerol is the primary fermentation product of yeast, besides ethanol and carbon dioxide, and can indirectly contribute to the sensory character of the wine [ 35 ].

It is a colourless, odourless, non-volatile compound, without aromatic properties. However, it contributes significantly to the sweetness, as well as to the full and round mouth-feel of wine and wine texture [ 36 ]. There is a difference in the levels of glycerol formed by various yeast strains, and therefore glycerol production should be considered in the selection of wine yeast strains [ 37 , 38 ].

Glycerol is mainly produced during glyceropyruvic fermentation at the start of alcoholic fermentation, and its degradation can be detrimental to the wine quality—partly because of the decrease of its concentration and partly because of the resulting metabolic products [ 39 ]. Glycerol concentrations of 5. Furthermore, glycerol can be metabolised by lactic acid bacteria during cider maturation, decreasing its final sensorial quality.

Glycerol level was 4. Besides ethanol and glycerol, methanol can also be present in measurable concentrations in some types of fruit wines e.

Fructose, glucose and, in some fruits, sucrose are the major sugars present in fruits. They are fermented by yeast during fruit wine fermentation, producing previously mentioned major metabolites: ethanol, carbon dioxide and glycerol.

However, fruits other than grapes are often much lower in sugar content compared to grapes, which makes them unsuitable for winemaking unless sugar content is adjusted by the addition of most often sucrose [ 14 ]. Sugars may also be metabolised to higher alcohols, fatty acid esters, and aldehydes, which mostly define the primary aromatic character of wine [ 33 ].

The sugars that remain unfermented i. The authors noted that sugar mostly sucrose is often added during different stages of the blackberry wine production, so the wide range of reducing sugars concentration found in investigated samples is probably the result of the applied technological procedure. Fruit species, climate and geomorphological character of soil determine the content of organic acids in fruit. Consequently, the acidity of fruits affects the fruit wine acidity.

Total acidity is the wine-quality parameter that gives the measure of the wine acidity, a parameter influencing the wine taste and the overall quality [ 43 ]. When it comes to grape wine tasting, a high level of acidity refers to excessively tart, sour and sharp wine attributes, while a low total acidity results in a flat-tasting wine that is more susceptible to infection and spoilage by microorganisms [ 45 ].

Organoleptic properties of musts and fruit wines are strongly influenced by organic acids [ 46 ]. The major organic acid present in blackberry, cherry and apple wines is malic acid, with reported concentrations of 3. The second most abundant is citric acid [ 14 ], while the predominant volatile acid is acetic acid, often expressed as the wine-quality parameter called volatile acidity.

Acetic acid is a secondary metabolite derived from a pyruvic acid, which is always formed during alcoholic fermentation.

Its accumulation in wine is usually the result of the secondary infection of the fruit, that is, the acetic acid bacteria activity, which is promoted by excessive oxygen uptake. The secondary infection can occur during the vinification process or after bottling [ 47 ]. Higher concentrations of acetic acid can detrimentally affect the organoleptic properties of wine, because of bitter taste and smell-like vinegar [ 39 ].

Besides acetic acid, as already mentioned, malic acid also contributes to the acidity of fruit wine. However, its degradation by malolactic fermentation MLF can reduce the acidity of the wine. MLF can occur spontaneously during or at the end of alcoholic fermentation or can be induced by the addition of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures, namely Oenococcus oeni as the primary species used in MLF.

Compared to malic acid, lactic acid has a softer flavour, which results in the more desirable flavour profile of wine [ 48 ]. Furthermore, the conversion of malic acid to lactic acid results in reduced wine acidity and improved stability and quality of high-acid wines [ 49 ].

Knowledge of the volatile composition of wine is of great interest; since these compounds are responsible for the quality of wine aroma. The aroma of fruit wines is mainly determined by volatile compounds produced by the fruit itself varietal wine aroma , as by-products of alcoholic and malolactic fermentation fermentative wine aroma , and formed during bottling, ageing and storing post-fermentative wine aroma [ 50 ].

Apart from the listed groups of volatiles, there are also many minor volatile and non-volatile compounds adding to the aroma of fruit wines, such as aldehydes, ketones, lactones, terpenes and phenols [ 51 ].

The amount of ethyl acetate in the investigated samples ranged from Although isoamyl alcohol was found in all samples, the measured values ranged from Fifty-five volatile compounds were detected in blackberry fruit juice before fermentation, while nine new aroma components such as octanoate, benzenepropanoic acid ethyl ester, ethyl benzoate, dodecyl ethyl, n-propanol, n-butanol, D-citronellol, benzaldehyde and cedrol were detected in natural ageing wine which appeared during secondary fermentation.

These findings emphasise the importance of natural ageing for the formation of aroma components of blackberry wine. Due to the high popularity of cherry wine, the volatile compounds of this fruit wine were in focus of several investigations as indicators of aroma profile of fruit wines. Fifty-one compounds were detected and subsequently quantified by GC—MS.

The conducted research revealed that the aroma-active compound profiles were dominated by ethyl 2-methyl propionate, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl butyrate, ethyl pentanoate, 3-methylbutanol, ethyl hexanoate, 3-hydroxybutanone, ethyl lactate, 1-hexanol, Z hexenol, ethyl hydroxyacetate, acetic acid, furfural, 2-ethylhexanol, benzaldehyde, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, guaiacol, beta-citronellol, hexanoic acid, 2-methoxymethylphenol, 2-ethylhydroxy-4H-pyranone, ethyl cinnamate and 2-methoxyvinylphenol.

The cluster analysis results suggested that esterification reactions and fermentation process were more extended during the ageing period and the production process could have a significant influence on volatile profile of cherry wines. The research revealed the major volatile components of investigated cherry wines: isoamylol, ethyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde and diethyl succinate.

The most abundant aroma compounds were esters, alcohols and lower fatty acids; total concentrations were Still, the dominant aroma component was isoamyl alcohol The same technique was used for the investigation of the temperature effect during apple winemaking on both the critical aroma compounds and sensory properties of wine.

The Idared wines had the best results of the sensory evaluation and high levels of butanol and acetic acid. Eighty volatile compounds belonging to groups of higher alcohols, fatty acids, esters and phenols were quantified.

These compounds were present in various amounts from 0. Alcohols formed the most abundant group, followed by esters and acids. Comparing to investigated grape wine, two alcohols, 4-methylpentanol and 2,3-butanediol, were not found in the three fruit wines. While the number of esters in raspberry 1. Odour activity values were detected for 21 compounds while 6 of them were identified as the particular aroma substances for wild strawberry wine, in particular, methyl 2-methylbutyrate, ethyl 2-methylbutyrate, methyl 3-methylbutyrate, E hexenol, 1-octenol and phenylacetaldehyde.

The formation of off-flavours represents the core problem of high-quality fruit wine production. The main compounds responsible for off-flavours of fruit wines are sulphur-containing volatiles, acetic acids and free amino nitrogen [ 14 ].

The volatile compounds containing sulphur, formed as a part of sulphur metabolism, include both molecules positively correlated to the aromatic profile of the wine volatile thiols , as well as those responsible for wine defects, such as notes described as cabbage, onion, rotten egg, garlic, sulphur and rubber.

Hydrogen sulphide and mercaptans e. However, their perception threshold is also low [ 68 ]. Wine quality is significantly influenced by phenolic compounds, namely anthocyanins, flavonols, catechins and other flavonoids since they have an enormous impact on the sensory characteristics of wines, mainly colour and astringency [ 69 ].

Furthermore, they exhibit a range of antioxidant and pharmacological effects. Phenolic compounds can be classified in different ways because they are constituted at a large number of heterogeneous structures that range from simple molecules to highly polymerised compounds.

Based on the total phenolic content, wines are commonly categorised to three major groups: i high in total phenolics, ii moderately high in total phenolics and iii low in total phenolics. The total phenolic content of cherry, raspberry, black currant, bilberry, elderberry and sea buckthorn fruit wines proved to be comparable or even higher than that of grape red wines, while apple, plum and peach fruit wines had a lower total phenolic content than red grape wines [ 20 , 87 , 88 , 89 ].

Among the phenolic compounds with known antioxidant activity, flavonoids, phenolic acids and tannins are highlighted [ 26 ]. Values are expressed as gallic acid equivalents milligrams of gallic acid per litre of fruit wine. Flavonoids , the most studied phenolics, are important components of the human diet.

Fruit Wine & Secco

Functional foods are foods that provide positive health effects apart from the provision of essential nutrients. Along with nutraceuticals, they represent the top trends in the food industry. Fruit wines are considered functional foods. When assessing the fruit wine quality, a wide range of descriptors are taken into consideration, namely physicochemical and sensorial properties of fruit wine.

Skip to search form Skip to main content. Biology Published DOI: Likewise, the production of fruit wines has become an integrated component of fruit processing industry, often compensating for post-harvest losses.

Science and Technology of Fruit Wine Production includes introductory chapters on the production of wine from fruits other than grapes, including their composition, chemistry, role, quality of raw material, medicinal values, quality factors, bioreactor technology, production, optimization, standardization, preservation, and evaluation of different wines, specialty wines, and brandies. Wine and its related products have been consumed since ancient times, not only for stimulatory and healthful properties, but also as an important adjunct to the human diet by increasing satisfaction and contributing to the relaxation necessary for proper digestion and absorption of food. Most wines are produced from grapes throughout the world, however, fruits other than grapes, including apple, plum, peach, pear, berries, cherries, currants, apricot, and many others can also be profitably utilized in the production of wines. The major problems in wine production, however, arise from the difficulty in extracting the sugar from the pulp of some of the fruits, or finding that the juices obtained lack in the requisite sugar contents, have higher acidity, more anthocyanins, or have poor fermentability.

Fruit of the Vine

This paper addresses an important technological problem of the fruit-wine industry Codex Alimentarius: wine made from fruit other than grapes : how to increase juice yield from raw material without compromising the quality of the final product. Fruit-wine consumption is significantly lower compared to traditional grape wines; however, in countries such as Great Britain, Poland or Russia, this type of beverage is well known and appreciated Noller and Wilson, ; Kiselev et al. A vast range of raw materials can be used for fruit-wine production: apple, pear, pineapple, guava, kiwi Soufleros et al. Selection of the raw material is mainly determined by traditional recipes existing in the country of origin. The fruit-wine technology is characterized by the specificity of the raw materials, which vary in their chemical content and requirements for different processing conditions. The production of such types of wine is often confronted with numerous problems such as low juice yield, difficulties with pressing, slow juice clarification, clouding and color changes in the final product Volchok et al. Currently, preprocessing of fruits and berries with various enzymes prior to pressing and filtration is considered to be the most effective solution to these technological problems Jayani et al. Selection of enzymes is based on their activities required for a particular fruit or berry. INBI RAS is developing new superior enzymes and enzymatic complexes with several activities at ratios allowing the efficient processing of various raw materials. Both enzyme preparations were derived from recombinant strains of Penicillium verruculosum.

Fruit Wine Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2016 - 2024

Fruit wine can be quite confusing at first. One would wonder why fruits would have their separate category when it comes to wine, given that grapes are also fruits. The great thing about fruit wine is that there are few restrictions. You can make it use any plant that can undergo fermentation so have your pick and get to it. You can extract the flavour and juice using many methods.

Fruit wines are prepared from the juice of fruits and naturally fermented with yeast. They are gaining popularity for their pleasant flavors and aromas.

Science and Technology of Fruit Wine Production includes introductory chapters on the production of wine from fruits other than grapes, including their composition, chemistry, role, quality of raw material, medicinal values, quality factors, bioreactor technology, production, optimization, standardization, preservation, and evaluation of different wines, specialty wines, and brandies. Wine and its related products have been consumed since ancient times, not only for stimulatory and healthful properties, but also as an important adjunct to the human diet by increasing satisfaction and contributing to the relaxation necessary for proper digestion and absorption of food. Most wines are produced from grapes throughout the world, however, fruits other than grapes, including apple, plum, peach, pear, berries, cherries, currants, apricot, and many others can also be profitably utilized in the production of wines. The major problems in wine production, however, arise from the difficulty in extracting the sugar from the pulp of some of the fruits, or finding that the juices obtained lack in the requisite sugar contents, have higher acidity, more anthocyanins, or have poor fermentability.

Cider, perry, fruit wines and other alcoholic fruit beverages

Although not as popular or as prevalent as wines produced from grapes, several Maryland wineries do make fruit wines. People often admit that they do not like fruit wines. However, take a hot summer day and add a frozen peach slice to a glass of chilled peach wine, and you are likely to see smiles on faces.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Top 10 Wine Producing Countries

Wine, on a very basic level, is made from fermented fruit. While people mostly associate wine with grapes, wine can be made from a wide array of fruits, so long as there's enough sugar content in the fruit to convert into alcohol during the fermentation process. Fruits that can be made into wine range from the familiar blackberries and pineapples to the exotic durians and mangosteens. One of the most widely produced non-grape fruit wines is cider, or "apple wine," which is made from fermented apples. Apple wines are prolific throughout England and the rest of the U. While ciders can be made of any apple variety, they are typically produced from specific cultivars that are high in sugar, which helps facilitate the fermentation process.

Fruit Wine

Science and Technology of Fruit Wine Production includes introductory chapters on the production of wine from fruits other than grapes, including their composition, chemistry, role, quality of raw material, medicinal values, quality factors, bioreactor technology, production, optimization, standardization, preservation, and evaluation of different wines, specialty wines, and brandies. Wine and its related products have been consumed since ancient times, not only for stimulatory and healthful properties, but also as an important adjunct to the human diet by increasing satisfaction and contributing to the relaxation necessary for proper digestion and absorption of food. Most wines are produced from grapes throughout the world, however, fruits other than grapes, including apple, plum, peach, pear, berries, cherries, currants, apricot, and many others can also be profitably utilized in the production of wines. The major problems in wine production, however, arise from the difficulty in extracting the sugar from the pulp of some of the fruits, or finding that the juices obtained lack in the requisite sugar contents, have higher acidity, more anthocyanins, or have poor fermentability. The book demonstrates that the application of enzymes in juice extraction, bioreactor technology, and biological de-acidification MLF bacteria, or de-acidifying yeast like schizosaccharomyces pombe, and others in wine production from non-grape fruits needs serious consideration.

The targeted fermentation of selected raw materials and the final refinement by our experts play a special role in the production of our fruit wines. We actively.

No surprise, except that not a grape is being poured. And in Connecticut they constitute a modest trend. In the last few years, some half-dozen farms and wineries have begun producing fruit wines to measurable success, capitalizing on shifts in tastes and generational preferences, not to mention what grows best in their own backyards.

Science and Technology of Fruit Wine Production

Meet the fast-growing Morad Winery which is introducing their line of delicious and astounding fruit wines and liqueurs to the kosher wine market. The traditions had been growing—and being perfected— for many generations, though far apart. When they met, a spectacular product was created that would capture the imagination of the kosher consumer and beyond. Yaakov Morad grew up in an Iraqi-Jewish family.

The production of fruit wines – a review

It seems as though when we think of home wine making, we think of grapes. Walk into your local liquor store. The racks are filled with countless wines produced from Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, Cabernet and other notable grapes.

The defining ingredient in wine is fermented fruit; that fruit traditionally consists of different grape varieties, but nearly any type of fruit ferments into wine.

NCBI Bookshelf. Fermentation is biotechnology in which desirable microorganisms are used in the production of value-added products of commercial importance. Fermentation occurs in nature in any sugar-containing mash from fruit, berries, honey, or sap tapped from palms. If left exposed in a warm atmosphere, airborne yeasts act on the sugar to convert it into alcohol and carbon dioxide. The making of wines and beers uses this biotechnology under controlled conditions.

Fruit wine

Fruit wines are fermented alcoholic beverages made from a variety of base ingredients other than grapes ; they may also have additional flavors taken from fruits, flowers, and herbs. This definition is sometimes broadened to include any fermented alcoholic beverage except beer. For historical reasons, mead , cider , and perry are also excluded from the definition of fruit wine. Fruit wines have traditionally been popular with home winemakers and in areas with cool climates such as North America and Scandinavia; in East Africa, India, and the Philippines, wine is made from bananas. Fruit wines are usually referred to by their main ingredient e. In the European Union, wine is legally defined as the fermented juice of grapes.

Fruit Wines Move Into a Sophisticated Realm

Tap into new customer groups with classic berry wines of excellent quality or stimulating sparkling fruit seccos. Indulge with fruit wine and secco concepts. Whether innovative mulled fruit wines or exotic fruit wine cocktails: we have the right fruit wine product to complement your portfolio appropriately. Our fruit wines are the bases for some of our most varied and innovative beverage concepts.

Comments 1
Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

  1. Grole

    Just that is necessary.